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Paperback In Cold Blood Book

ISBN: 0679745580

ISBN13: 9780679745587

In Cold Blood

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Book Overview

National Bestseller On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing...

Customer Reviews

8 ratings

Chilling and Disturbing = Fantastic Read

Truman Capote spent four years writing "In Cold Blood" and the fruits of his labor are beyond amazing. From the very beginning you're entranced by the Clutters' lives and how they came to a halt on that terrible night. Interweaving facts from the case with his own imagining of how things may have played out, Capote horrifies and shocks his readers with a murder that shouldn't have happened to begin with.

I ordered this book from here and it never came :/

The shipping code no longer works and I never receicved the book. Oddly enough it was the same price as this one.. weak!

Great writing holds you captive

Superbly Written

In Cold Blood follows the true murder of the Clutters in Holcomb, Kansas, 1959. This non fiction work is told from a couple of perspectives: - The Clutters, on the day of the murder. You follow them throughout their daily routine, an attempt to see the world through their eyes. - Perry Smith & Dick Hickock: the Lansing cell mates, released on parole, and who teamed up and comitted the 4 murders. - Detective Al Dewey as he tries to connect the dots and find who had killed the Clutters and why. I expected the book to be a fast paced one, where clues would be found every couple of pages and so on. But the fact that you know who the murderers are from the beginning made this a more leisurely paced read, and where you only know the full details of what happened towards the end. The writing style, and the change in narrators made it feel like a work of fiction (and as you read, you really wish it were fiction). I didn't want to feel any empathy for Perry and Dick, and although Capote forces you to see that they had problems, you are left to decide whether you feel for them or not. Towards the end of the book, two works of fiction sprang to mind because of something Perry said. "He used to say that all crimes were "varieties of theft". Murder included." That instantly brought The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini to mind; I remember the father was talking to the protagonist and said something similar to that. Also, later when Perry talks about how he's sorry that he's lost his freedom but not sorry for the crime (that he doesn't really feel anything), I couldn't help but remember Mersault from The Outsider by Albert Camus. The only thing I wish had been dealt with more was the 'why' of the murders. Yes, we got to know about Perry's difficult childhood and Dick's injury, but I guess what I wanted was something unrealistic, a clear cut answer of why what happened happened. And these kinds of things seem to never have answers.

In Cold Type...

Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood' is enjoying a resurgence of popularity thanks to the Oscar-winning film depicting the author's life and work during the writing of this phenomenal piece. At one point in the film, the character Capote makes the statement that when he thinks about how good this book will be, he can hardly breathe. Perhaps it is because it is part of our history now, I don't consider the book to be that good, but it was a work fairly close to groundbreaking in its impact - it was a new genre, the narrative telling of a non-fiction event as if it were a fictional novel. The narrative centres upon the murder of a Kansas family by two men, Perry Smith and Dick Hicock, who are in many ways far from typical killers, much less cold blooded killers. The family, the Clutters of Holcombe, Kansas, are far from typical victims, nor is this the kind of place such a murder would be expected. Capote does a remarkable job at an even-handed analysis and narrative treatment of all the characters, from the family itself to the townspeople and investigators, as well as the murderers themselves. Perhaps it is because he found an area of identification? This is a psychological thriller of a sort - at least it would be, were it not a true life tale. Getting into the minds of the criminals and the investigators was no easy task for Capote, but what comes forth on the page is very crisp and insightful reporting, without the kinds of embellishments one might expect from a figure such as Capote when dealing with middle-America folk. The question of why for the killing is still never fully resolved, despite Capote's attempt to set out all the story and psychological detail. Perhaps this is as strange as the interest Capote took in the subject in the first place, as well as the effect it had on him, and those around him, ultimately - while Capote himself never again finished a major project after this, that is also true of his assistant, Nell Harper Lee, whose book 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (done about the same time as 'In Cold Blood') was also her last major writing. A worthwhile book in many ways.

In Cold Blood - My thoughts on the book

After reading the book I have to say that it was a good book. It was full of action, suspense, and some gory scenes. The first half of the book excited me more than the second half, I found that after the murdering was over the book slightly lost appeal, though the plot thickening and suspense kept me reading. The fact that there really was a killing involving the Clutters made the book almost awkward to read, I felt like I shouldn't have been reading it because it was based on the murdering of the Clutters. The plot was very well thought through and I believe the book is written in a way that keeps the reader from putting it down.I recommend this book to almost everyone excluding the younger people out there, the scenes were slightly graphic. For the most part, this book was a great read.

It Just Doesn't Get Any Better

The magnificence of "In Cold Blood" doesn't lie in the subject matter but in its treatment. There are--unfortunately--more depraved criminals and more elaborate police investigations detailed in a great many "true crime" accounts. But I doubt that any of them is as well written as "In Cold Blood."I haul my copy out every 2-3 years just to remind myself how wonderful the rhythms and nuances of the American language can be at the hands of a master. I am totally drawn into the lives of the prosperous and completely unsuspecting Clutter family of western Kansas and the two drifters, Perry and Dick, who by themselves didn't amount to much but together proved lethal that fall night in 1959.A trivia note: Capote's research assistant on this book was Nell Harper) Lee, who shortly after would become famous as the author of "To Kill a Mockingbird."I'd recommend Gerald Clarke's excellent biography "Capote" to learn about this one-of-a-kind book, its creation, reception, and how it affected the author's life.

In Cold Blood Mentions in Our Blog

In Cold Blood in The Best Beach Books
The Best Beach Books
Published by Ashly Moore Sheldon • July 31, 2020

We may not get to hang out on our favorite beaches this summer. But whether or not you get to bury your toes in the sand, you can drift away with one of these timeless tales. And be sure to check out some of the hottest new reads, too.

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