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Paperback Rich Dad's Rich Kid,Smart Kid(SC) (Rich Dad's, 4) Book

ISBN: 7505382950

ISBN13: 9787505382954

Rich Dad's Rich Kid,Smart Kid(SC) (Rich Dad's, 4)

(Book #4 in the Rich Dad Series)

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Format: Paperback

Condition: Like New

$18.19

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Book Overview

This description may be from another edition of this product. In the information Age, a good education is more important than ever. But the current educational system may not be providing all the information your child needs. This book was designed to fill in...

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

Rich Dad's Rich Kid by Kiyosaki

The author suggests that parents empower children to take control of their finances early in life. The author challenges us to turn education about money into wealth and cash flow. Children are encouraged to seek professional careers and to begin small businesses to ensure cash flow well into retirement. The author's Kolbe Index seeks to train people to analyze facts, formulate follow-up scenarios, start projects quickly/efficiently and implement rational solutions devoid of analysis paralysis problems. This work is well worth the money for the information content provided.

Book Summary

Our current education system fails to adequately teach our children the financial skills necessary to survive later on in life. Robert Kiyosaki wrote Rich Kid, Smart Kid to fill those gaps. The fundamental premise of the book is that all children are born smart and rich. The goal of education is to bring out that natural genius within our children. Awakening this genius inside of us is a sure way to become happy. Therefore, being happy through realizing our innate potential is more fulfilling than being rich and unhappy. Rich Dad said, "If you are not happy while getting rich, chances are you will not be happy when you get rich. So whether you are rich or poor, make sure you are happy" (14).The root of the current problem lies in America's transitioning from an Industrial society into an Information society. Kiyosaki explains the need for transitioning our thought, "In the Information Age, what you know becomes obsolete very quickly. What you learned is important, but not as important as how fast you can learn, change, and adapt to new information" (xi). These structural changes tangibly affect us regardless of whether or not we acknowledge them. Some of the problems facing tomorrow's youth include social security, healthcare, increased risk of obsolesce through increased specialization, and the need for lifelong education. Education must adjust with the times. Currently, our education system teaches scholastic and professional skills. Scholastic education focuses on the ability to read, write, and do arithmetic. Professional education trains students for high-level careers later on in life. However, this Western brand of education fails our children in some crucial ways. Rich Dad said, "The child learns by doing, making mistakes, and then learning" (238). It's failure lies in its unconscious suppression of the innate genius within all of us, and by dismissing the role mistakes play in the learning process. This happens when our education system forces us to conform to what is only a partial definition of what intelligence is.Financial education should be taught as soon as the child demonstrates some interest. While this may happen as early as five years old, more commonly a child's perceptions and self-identity is formulated between the ages of nine and fifteen. It is crucial to form the child's perception concerning money in a positive light during these ages. Encouraged by a famous Chicago-based study on learning, Kiyosaki believes, "...a parent's most important job is to monitor, guide, and protect a child's self-perception" (109). As a parent, the process begins by devising a "winning formula" for your children. The formula Kiyosaki recommends should be tailored to each child based on their interests and which of the several types of genius they possess. Success requires having at least a winning formula for learning, for being a professional, and for financial success. We must be flexible enough to adjust our winning formulas when conditio

I have given this away many times as a gift

Can't think of a better way to prepare our young for the harsh realities of life and in particular wealth building than Rich Dad's Rich Kid Smart Kid. Sure beats memorizing war dates and boring basic economics.I am giving this away to nephews and nieces as an accessory gift. What a way to get the family off to a great financial headstart.Highly recommended!

Parental Tips for Helping Children Learn Rich Dad, Poor Dad

Rich Dad's Rich Kid, Smart Kid may be the most helpful book ever for guiding adults on how to assist children and teenagers in learning about how to organize their lives to be more successful. I highly recommend this book to every parent, god parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, and caring older sibling.I think this is the best of the Rich Dad, Poor Dad series, and clearly deserves more than five stars. Think of this book as the instructor's guide to teaching Rich Dad, Poor Dad combined with a basic guide to helping young people identify their strengths and learning styles. The book also provides a sound foundation for helping young people build their self-confidence in a healthy way. Unlike the other books in the series, this one draws on the positive lessons of both Mr. Kiyosaki's Rich Dad and his Poor Dad rather than just the Rich Dad. To overcome Mr. Kiyosaki's lack of experience as a parent (he has no children), the book relies on important academic and professional research to add context for Mr. Kiyosaki's observations about his own childhood.The book begins by citing a recent HEW study that showed that 56 out of 100 people who are 65 need either government or family financial assistance to make ends meet. The book is aimed at providing children with the learning experiences to allow them to avoid that dismal financial result.Then the perspective shifts to pointing out that the change from an industrial to an information economy has shifted the rules of success in our society. The old rules were to get a good education, get a good job, and have financial security from one employer. The new rules are quite different and feature being in an environment in which one will be a free agent, work in a virtual company, get paid for results, work in many professions, retire early, work only when you are interested in working, learn in seminars rather than classes, focus on your core talents, emphasize developing and implementing new ideas, self-direct your own investments for retirement, and work at home rather than in an office.To succeed, your child will need at least three basic strategies: one for lifelong learning, one for developing a career, and one for creating financial success. The book points out that most people will have to relearn the most important areas they work in about every 2-4 years, shift professions as they reach the age at which they become obsolete, and make their money work hard for them. In the second part of the book, you will learn many basic ways to help your child learn these lessons. He points out the work of Howard Gardner in emphasizing that each of us has different dimensions to the ways our intelligence expresses itself. Find out what your child's is, praise that, and provide your guiding experiences in terms of that way of learning. In almost all cases, children like to learn through play, playing in the ways they like to play and focusing on subjects that interest them. In Mr. Kiyosaki's case, he lik

Great Headstart! A real gift for your family!

I don't normally buy follow-up books because I find them to be quite repetitive, however, this one is a true exception."Rich Dad" made such an impact with me that I have shared it with many others over the past two years. That said, my wife and I have struggled with how to take what we've learned and pass it on to our children. This book is it! As we all struggle to ensure our children get the best education possible, we're facing an ironic trend in the school systems where teachers are teaching our children how to pass standardized tests instead of focusing on what children need to thrive in this new century (this is not a knock on that practice - if that's what it takes today, that's what it takes, but our children need more and it's our responsiblity as parents to provide the rest - we cannot rely on our school systems to be the sole educators of our children (sorry for the sermon)). This book was designed to fill in the gaps, to give your kids what they're missing from school - inspiring and practical financial knowledge.It's not about turning little Johnny into a power stock-broker, but rather awakening his love of learning so that doors will open for him - it's a way of empowering our children by giving them the skills they'll need to succeed in every aspect of their lives.I can't recommend a book more than I do this one!The best to you and yours!
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