Skip to content
Paperback The Wind in the Willows Book

ISBN: 1593082657

ISBN13: 9781593082659

The Wind in the Willows

Select Format

Select Condition ThriftBooks Help Icon

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Very Good

$4.69
Save $5.26!
List Price $9.95

2 Available

Book Overview

&&LIThe Wind in the Willows&&L/I, by &&LBKenneth Grahame&&L/B, is part of the &&LIBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I&&LI &&L/Iseries, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of &&LIBarnes & Noble Classics&&L/I: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies...

Customer Reviews

7 ratings

Ordered very good, got a poor copy at best

Its basically destroyed, highlighter everywhere, stickers came on the front. I waited over a month and this is what I got? Absolute joke. I ordered a VERY GOOD copy...

This book is not in good condition. It has very heavy annotations throughout...so many, the story i

I have to order another book, this one is i poor conditions with HEAVY annotations throughout. :-(

Complex

This was a very interesting book. As I read it I felt like Toad was a `Prodigal Son', who came back only far enough to receive acceptance, then returned to his bad habits till he was in trouble again. It reminded me much of myself, playing at being Christian before really giving Christ all areas of my life. Like Toad I would repent, but then not really change. Rat was wise and resourceful, Mole was tender and caring and awe-full like a child yet also very wise. Badger is like a wise mature old mentor or guide, sent to give direction, and lead one to find one's own purpose in life. Yet the mix of Animal and Human society just did not make sense to me. It felt like a badly planned Narnia novel. It did not explain how the animal and human worlds came to interact and share a language or culture. But over all it was a fun read even if dry in some spots. (First written as Journal Reading Notes in 1999.)

Lovely artwork

The soft whimsical full-page illustrations make this edition a keeper. I'd buy anything illustrated by Inga Moore if this is a representative sample of her work. Excellent accompaniment to the text. If you're a Grahame purist perhaps you might pass on it but most kids (and adults) would enjoy this edition.

Beautiful edition

We have this edition - I didn't know about the missing chapters mentioned above - I'll have to look for a complete edition now. But I still won't trade this one for anything! I got this for Christmas to read to our three year-old - and he absolutely loves it. It was my single favorite present of Christmas 2004.

Continues to stand the test of time

When I was very young (about six thousand years ago), our school master used to read to us from Wind in the Willows. The stories had a magical quality and a few weeks ago, as a somewhat older person, I got to wondering whether they would still have that sense of enchantment that held us so captivated all those years ago.I was NOT disappointed. Toad was just as cantankerous and difficult as ever. Badger, Rat and Mole were just as supportive - just as memorable. Badger is unpredictable but protective (and sometimes mean). Mole is timid and shy. Rat is courageous and romantic. And who could ever forget those dreadful gun-toting weasels, ferrets and stoats glorying in their take-over of Toad Hall? Wind in the Willows is a true masterpiece of allegory with endless moral lessons disguised as a children's story. It is also a lesson in things long-forgotten... the glory of floating noiselessly down a river at dawn, past loosestrife, willowherb, bulrushes and meadowsweet. How many of us have even heard of these meadow plants, never mind seen them. But it doesn't matter, because it evokes nostalgia either for things long-forgotten or for things never-known.At a child's level, Wind in the Willows is about friendship and about life in an imagined world centered around the river. At a less innocent level, Wind in the Willows draws many parallels with life, though Kenneth Grahame managed to avoid preaching his lessons. Not the least of Graham's parables is that 'the bigger they are, the harder they fall' because Toad is as egotistical and as self-important as they come until being thrown in jail for 'borrowing' a car. After that, it's all downhill for Toad, and it is only thanks to the loyalty of his friends that he regains some of his position in society - though not before learning a little humility first.Though, at an older age, we pretend to be more sophisticated, at heart we always hold out the hope of a return to innocence and simple adventures. We are still (most of us) perfectly capable of identifying with the animals and the idea, as one reviewer put it, of two school-aged hedgehogs frying ham for a mole and a water rat, in a badger's kitchen does my imagination no harm whatsoever! As for Grahame's choice of phrase (...the "remotest dungeon of the best-guarded keep of the stoutest castle in all the length and breadth of Merry England"...) it's almost as poetically attention-grabbing as Rowan Atkinson's Blackadder series.If you're looking for laser guns and hi-tech wars, W-i-t-W is NOT the book to buy. If you're after something a little more gentle (and a little more intelligent) Wind in the Willows is an outstanding example of a Classic that continues to withstand the test of time.

Another classic for all ages

I was introduced to the denizens of the river when I was very small - maybe age three or four. My edition was illustrated by Arthur Rackham, still the best version to this day, IMO (much as I love Ernest Shepherd's work...)I still remember being entranced by the juxtaposition of lyrical descriptions and occasionally wild and crazy action, expecially when Mr. Toad was involved - prefect balance for a child, and a terrific introduction to the wonders of the language in the hands of a true master. And one phrase - "Be my eyes, Ratty!" - has stayed with me ever since - that was when I really GOT the idea of helping and selflessness.I still have my beat-up old book and make sure that all the children of my acquaintance have a good hardback Rackham copy. This classic - forget Disney - is right up there with the original Poohs, and I'm sure it will remain a favorite for generations to come. Do yourself and the children in your life a favor and read it - preferably out loud - and prepare to laugh, smile, shed a tear, and never forget.

The Wind in the Willows Mentions in Our Blog

The Wind in the Willows in Ode to Spring: 10 Books to Celebrate the Season of Renewal
Ode to Spring: 10 Books to Celebrate the Season of Renewal
Published by Ashly Moore Sheldon • March 20, 2020

Happy Spring! This is a time of renewal and rebirth, infusing us with hope in the form of burgeoning buds and fragrant breezes. Light lingers and birdsong fills our ears. Despite all else, the earth pulses with life and resilience. Here are ten books that celebrate the season.

Copyright © 2020 Thriftbooks.com Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Do Not Sell My Personal Information | Accessibility Statement
ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC
GoDaddy Verified and Secured